Bulli Briefs

coggee pub black 1946“BLACK” BEER DRINKERS BANNED

Excelsior miners’ lodge [Thirroul], at a pit-top meeting today, carried a resolution that if any member of the lodge is seen drinking at any hotel other than the Bulli Family Hotel, which is the only “white” hotel on the coast, the members of the lodge will refuse to work with the offender.

– The Sydney Morning Herald January 8 1941

A HAUL OF FISH

Mr. Jack Floyd and a party of Bulli enthusiasts had luck that surprised themselves last weekend when out with Mr. Jack Bain in his motor launch. They went out to the Islands, near Wollongong, and there was certainly no Jonah on board, for, immediately the lines were cast the fish began to bite. Returning to land in the afternoon the catch was counted and totalled 160, including, all species, chiefly schnapper. Many have since been congratulating themselves that they had a friend in the party, for the fish was freely distributed.

– Illawarra Mercury May 1 1925 

TWO MEN IN A BOAT.

Two men in a motor boat were forced to land at Bulli on Sunday night, and were surprised to learn, their where abouts. They came from Port Hacking. The small craft is still near Bulli jetty, with the bottom caved in through bumping on the bar at the channel used by local fishermen. The men were given accommodation for the night by Mr. Harry Brown, secretary of the local Fishing Club.

– Illawarra Mercury July 20 1923

SEA LEOPARD CAUGHT IN BULLI BATHS

A dark grey sea leopard, measuring 6ft 6in, and bearing evidence of an attack by sharks, was discovered in the Bulli Baths early this morning by Mr. Burrows, proprietor of the Bulli Beach kiosk. The leopard, seeking shelter near the beach, was evidently washed into the baths by heavy seas. It was secured by a long rope, and removed to the verandah of the kiosk.

– The Sydney Morning Herald August 31 1927

THE LOST FOUND.

Mr and Mrs John Colliss, of Campbell-street, Woonona, who were lost in the bush at Cataract, were found near Darke’s Forest late yesterday afternoon by one of the search parties from Appin and Bulli. They appeared little the worse for their experience. During the 24 hours they were without food they covered 25 miles.

– Sydney Evening News September 19 1916

GIRL’S LEG BROKEN

childrens swing

Thelma May, 14, of Newtown, Sydney, has been admitted to Bulli Hospital with a broken right leg. The girl was riding on the razzle-dazzle in Thirroul Park when she jumped off and was struck. She fell and her limb was pinned as one side of the machine swung low.

– The Labor Daily December 28 1927

SAVAGE ATTACK BY BEES.

Mr. Hartley, a resident of Darke’s Forest, purchased three hives of bees at Clifton, and while removing the hives in boxes in his cart, a number of the bees escaped when crossing the railway line. They instantly attacked the horse, which bolted, causing more bees to escape, and they also attacked the driver and the horse. Residents obtained control of the horse, and extricated Mr. Hartley. His condition necessitated his removal to the Illawarra Cottage Hospital, where it was estimated that about 200 stings were withdrawn from his face.

– The Sydney Morning Herald January 29 1918 

BULLI SOIL— BUT NOT FOR BULLI

Famous the world over for the construction of cricket pitches, Bulli soil is NOT used on the South Coast wickets. At the annual reunion of the Wollongong Waratah Cricket Club, Mr. Charles Prior, an old resident of the district, expressed surprise that the clubs on the South Coast played on concrete wickets.

– The Sydney Sun July 9 1933

FALLS OFF PIER AND DROWNS

Believed to have over balanced after taking a fit, Gordon Reay, 14, of Austinmer Heights, fell from Bulli jetty yesterday and was drowned. The boy, who was subject to fits, had been fishing from the Jetty. William Taylor, of Slacky Flat, Bulli, who had been fishing nearby, saw the boy’s fall, and ran to a boatshed for assistance. After dragging in 30ft. of water for 15 minutes, fishermen summoned by Taylor, and Bulli Ambulance men recovered Reay’s body. Artificial respiration was carried on for two hours, but Reay did not respond.

– Sydney Daily News Monday 29 May 1939 

JETTY COLLAPSES

A large portion in the centre of the Bulli jetty collapsed and fell into the sea on Sunday afternoon and four fishermen were trapped on the end. They were rescued by a fishing boat which put out from the nearby boat harbour. This jetty has not been used by ships since 1943 when it was extensively damaged by heavy seas and the end washed away. Since then further damage has been caused by storms but it has remained a popular spot for fishermen. When the jetty collapsed Thirroul Surf Club sent its surf boat to the rescue of the stranded men but in the meantime the fishing boat had reached the scene and the men slid down a cable into the boat.

– South Coast Times Thursday 10 February 1949 

 

TWO MEN IN A BOAT

Two men in a motor boat were forced to land at Bulli on Sunday night, and were surprised to learn, their where-a-bouts. They came from Port Hacking. The small craft is still near Bulli jetty, with the bottom caved in through bumping on the bar at the channel used by local fishermen. The men were given accommodation for the night by Mr. Harry Brown, secretary of the local Fishing Club.

– Illawarra Mercury Friday 20 July 1923

BEER FOR BULLI

In a sermon preached the other day to young men, the Rev. Mr. Tate, the rector of Bulli, said the total amount of beer consumed in Bulli and Woonona during the six months ended December 31, 1898, was 11,698 gallons (44282 litres), which, added to bottled beer and beer which arrived by team from Wollongong, showed a monthly expenditure in beer alone of £400. These statements have created considerable discussion, but so far no one has disputed their correctness.

– Leader (Orange) Wednesday 18 January 1899

UNUSUAL FALL

SYDNEY. January 3. Mr. T. Freeman, electrical engineer for the Bulli Shire, while staying at a hotel at Moss Vale, mistook French window for a doorway at night, stepped out, and he fell 20 feet to the paved yard below. His thigh was fractured in five places. His condition is serious.

– The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA) Wednesday 4 January 1933

MISSING DUNNY

In these days of fuel scarcity, food and clothing rationing, many things are stolen, but probably one of the strangest thefts was the one reported to the Bulli Shire Council on Monday night by the South Thirroul Surf Life Saving Club, who reported that the lavatories at the beach had been pulled down and stolen during the winter.”

– Illawarra Mercury Friday 10 December 1943

SOMEBODY’S BLUNDER

A colossal stack of coal, estimated to contain 65,000 tons has been lying at Bulli since 1917. It is deteriorating and has probably lost 65 per cent of its value. No one definitely knows who owns it, but it is believed to have been bought by Mr. Hughes for the Commonwealth, at a cost of £100,000.

– Geraldton Guardian (WA) Thursday 24 January 1924.

BELLAMBI COAL

BULLI, Friday – The shipments of coal from Port Bellambi last week totalled 3750 tons. Of this quantity 550 tons went to Victoria, 250 tons to New Zealand, and the balance to Sydney.

– Sydney Evening News Saturday 5 December 1896.

BULLI NEW HALL

Bulli, Tuesday: The splendid new hall recently erected by the Odd fellows was opened, last evening, by the Lynch Family of Bellringers, who afforded a musical treat. The building was densely packed, fully 700 persons being present. The hall is a very fine one, and quite a credit to the district.

– Sydney Evening News Wednesday 20 January 1886.

BULLI SOIL

Over 160 bags of Bulli soil was shipped at the [Bulli] jetty on Monday last to be used for
the Melbourne Cricket Ground pitch. This soil was selected out of many samples forwarded from other parts of the State.

– Illawarra Mercury Saturday 21 March 1903

TELEGRAPH ARRIVES

BULLI. Wednesday.
The telegraph to Clifton village, at Coal Cliff, was completed last night, and a message sent through this morning to Electric Telegraph Department in Sydney.

– The Maitland Mercury Saturday 27 April 1878.

PROGRESSIVE BULLI

A record building year was experienced in the Shire during 1927, when 125 new buildings, valued at £60,496, were erected, and additions numbering 97, with a value of £39,344, were also constructed. In addition to these amounts Public school buildings are being built at a cost of £18,000.

– The Sydney Morning Herald Tuesday 17 January 1928

FLOWER PICKING FINES

At Bulli Court today 19 persons, all from the metropolitian area,were fined for picking Christmas bells on Crown land, near top of Bulli Pass during Christmas week. Evidence was given that defendants were caught with from 12 to 100 bells in their possession. The fines ranged from £1 to £2. Many of the defendants stated that they did not know they were offending. Mr. Hardwick, S.M., advised them to read the newspapers.

– The Sydney Morning Herald Saturday 29 January 1938.

BOYS BRAVERY

A verdict of accidental death was returned by the Bulli Coroner, Mr. Keegan, to-day, at the inquiry into the death of Mrs. Florence Angwin, and her son and daughter, Francis, 8, and Lola, 6, who were drowned at Helensburgh on Boxing Day. The Coroner congratulated Hugh and Alexander Blair for the bravery they displayed in going to the rescue. He expressed the opinion that their action should be recognised by the Royal Humane Society.

– Daily Examiner (Grafton, NSW) Friday 17 January 1936.

1932 BULLI STATS

Mr. Hicks, C.P.S., has kindly supplied us with the following vital statistics, as recorded at Bulli Court House, for the quarter ended 30th September :- Births, 50 (28 males, 22 females) ; Deaths (10 males, 4 females); Marriages 14.

– llawarra Mercury Friday 14 October 1932

UNUSUAL FALL

SYDNEY. January 3. Mr. T. Freeman, electrical engineer for the Bulli Shire, while staying at a hotel at Moss Vale, mistook French window for a doorway at night, stepped out, and he fell 20 feet to the paved yard below. His thigh was fractured in five places. His condition is serious.

– The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA) Wednesday 4 January 1933

HURLED 20 FEET

After receiving, a shock from a high-tension wire, Herbert Ashford, of Bulli, was hurled 20 feet. He suffered only severe shock, Ashford took shelter in an iron shed while men digging a pipe line fired; a charge of explosive. A stone from the charge brought down a high-tension wire, which fell against the shed. Ashford, who was leaning against the shed, was thrown out of the door on to the road.

– Albury Banner Friday 23 December 1938.

BIG BULLI BULLOCK

Another big bullock, purchased as a prize winner at Sydney Show, was this week served up to customers at Floyd’s butcher shop (corner Park Road and Main Road), Bulli. Mr. Jack Floyd surprised several by carrying from the cart to the block a forequarter, which weighed 440 lbs.

– Illawarra Mercury Friday 1 May 1925.

BULLI PASS PAVILION

‘Traveller’ writes: The pavilion recently erected at the “Look-out”, instead of answering the purpose intended is the common resort of tramps, whose ideas of tidiness are very small, consequently what was intended as a public boon to sightseers is now neither use nor ornament.

– Illawarra Mercury Saturday 21 March 1903.

 

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